First Prize Letters

The Soviet plan to absorb a million destitute Polish Jews, starting with 1,500 in Biro-Bidjan next February, is of utmost universal significance to Jews, toward reducing human misery, saving European Jewry from extinction and setting a noble example to the world.

Through Poland’s anti-Semitic policy the Jews have absolutely nothing to look forward to in that country, except complete annihilation, through starvation, destitution, and pogroms. Biro-Bidjan offers them an escape from this Fascist hell and an opportunity at permanent rehabilitation.

With capitalism crumbling, the Jew is ruthlessly forced into the ranks of the desperate hungry proletariat. He is exploited as a scapegoat. If the Jew must play his historical role as a pioneer of a new social order it will be much easier in a proletarian role. Although this would bring other Jews in closer sympathy with the Soviet it cannot be helped; but it is better than being scapegoatized as Communists in general. Soviet Russia is the only country that shows warm sympathy to destitute, foreign Jews. She offers them a haven, a home, and a republic.

This noble example may attract Jews of Rumania, Germany and Austria to seek similar arrangements with Soviet Russia. The exodus of Jews may result in better treatment to the remaining Jews. Perhaps in competition, other nations might humanize their immigration laws, especially Britain in Palestine. If our salvation lies in the new order, these pioneering refugees can help to develop it in Soviet Russia.

The Jew is being offered a secure home where his rights as a man and a Jew will be respected.

The Jew is being offered a new start in life. The hardships that may be incurred in the first years in a new land are as naught with the benefits to be derived. The chance to live in a land free from persecution, discrimination and terrorism is something new in the annals of Jewish history.

Work, homes, security and constitutional rights, are being offered to the Jew. This is news. But coming at a time like this when every civilized nation of the world has shut its doors to the oppressed, wandering Jew, it looms as an event of the greatest significance.

The welcome hand extended by the Soviet should be grasped by the Jews throughout the world. It is the biggest news of the week.

The Miami convention of the A. A. U. created confusion in the public mind concerning its attitude toward the utter unsportsmanlike discrimination against German Jewish athletes. The Jewish delegation was considerably larger than was present at any previous convention.

Why did they not raise their voices as representatives of outraged public opinion? What occurred to stifle the vigorous protests of Alfred E. Smith, Samuel Untermyer, William Green and others? How is it that the pleas of various youth organizations never reached the floor of the gathering?

The Olympics awarded to Berlin would signify not only American endorsement of German sport betrayal but also the approval of the inhuman Nazi atrocities.

Furthermore, such action would sever the nucleus of the anti-Nazi boycott by placing at Minister Schacht’s disposal funds derived by the influx of sport enthusiasts, thus assuring the continued existence of Hitlerism.

All of which has a vast significance to Jews. Our voice is in reality small—though we do not like to admit it. We must fight and carry the fight to the bitter end.

NEXT STORY