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World Press Digest

“Israel’s Messenger,” a Shanghai publication, reporting on the pledge given by the Manchukuo government to curb anti-Semitism, says:

The Harbin Consul General, Marishima, invited officially the president of the Jewish community, Dr. A. Kaufman and a member of the presidium, Mr. I. Berkovich. The conversation lasted about two hours, the Consul General evidencing keen interest in the affairs of the Jewish community. He stated that there existed a friendship between the Japanese and the Jewish people for several years and he was sure that this relationship would be continued uninterruptedly in future. Mr. Marishima expressed the wish to study and investigate the needs of the Jewish community. It came to his knowledge that the latter were facing hardships and even hostilities from certain sources which he felt sure he could suppress immediately. As a representative of Japan which was friendly disposed toward the Jews and as a representative of the power protecting the new state of Manchoukuo, it would be his duty to take into consideration the disabilities under which all the element of the community had lived and suffered. He invited the Jewish leaders to hear from them what grievances they had so that he could render them full assistance.

AN ENGLISH DAILY ON NAZI KIDNAPING

“The Manchester Guardian,” in an editorial commenting on the Nazi terror in connection with the kidnaping of German-Jewish refugees on foreign soil, says:

The terror is like some octopus that stretches out its tentacles in search of those who have sought refuge from it. Those tentacles paw and probe neighboring countries, especially when those countries are relatively weak, like Czechoslovakia or Switzerland. It is by no means sure that the capitals of stronger countries are safe —Paris, for example—and that the monster has its eye on London was shown recently by activities connected with the kidnaping of Berthold Jakob. The most recent of the monster’s catches was made the other day on Czech soil. A German refugee was actually arrested outside of Germany by German armed officials, kicked and beaten, and then carried into Germany, a Czech official who tried to save him being seriously injured. Switzerland is making a determined stand on behalf of Berthold Jakob and refuses to be put off with the false or evasive replies made to Swiss representations. It is to be hoped that Czechoslovakia, one of the few countries in Central Europe where the individual is still respected as such, will show equal determination.

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