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Between the Lines

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The hearings which start tomorrow at Rutgers University into charges that members of the German department of the school’s Women’s College are spreading anti-Semitic and pro-Nazi literature among the students, will be watched by all those interested in checking Nazi propaganda in America.

It is a fact that the Nazis are making an effort to reach the American youth through the dissemination of anti-Jewish propaganda in the universities. This fact was emphasized openly by Dr. Sachar, director of the Hillel Foundation, at the recent convention of the B’nai B’rith in Washington. Its truth is substantiated by Prof. Leinard Bergel’s charge that he has been dismissed for his attempt to fight the pro-Nazi spirit in the Women’s College of Rutgers.

SUSPICION AND CITIZENSHIP

Many will be puzzled by the fact that the faculty of the German department is composed entirely of German citizens. Anyone residing in America and still retaining his German citizenship at a time when Germany is condemned by liberal people the world over, may naturally be suspected of being sympathetic towards the Nazi regime.

The teachers in the German department of the Women’s College at Rutgers are now under this suspicion, both by public opinion and by the students of the University. More than 400 students of the College have openly declared themselves in sympathy with Prof. Bergel and did not hesitate to come out in the press with the accusation that the Nazi spirit is stimulated among the students by the members of the German faculty of the college.

VIOLATION OF STATE LAW

The outcome of the inquiry which starts tomorrow is therefore of importance not only to Rutgers University but to all universities in the country where the Nazis are trying to spread their poisonous anti-Jewish propaganda. It is quite clear that now that such an inquiry has been instituted for the first time in America, the Nazi agents in other universities will have to restrict their activities for a time in order not to be discovered.

The outcome of the inquiry is also of importance to the State of New Jersey. Only a few weeks ago the State passed a law prohibiting subversive propaganda. Should the inquiry prove that such propaganda was conducted by the teachers of the German department in the college, it will be tantamount to proving that the law of the State had been violated, and may lead to the proper consequences.

EYES ON NEW BRUNSWICK

Only a short time ago the State of New Jersey was considering granting a large subsidy to the Women’s College. Now such a subsidy is out of the question until the issue is settled. The eyes of legislators, educators and all those interested in seeing the laws of the United States observed, will therefore be turned to New Brunswick where the inquiry will begin tomorrow.

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