Rutgers’ Trustees Back Dismissal of Bergel

The board of trustees of Rutgers University has decided to accept the report of the special committee which investigated the dismissal of Lienhard Bergel, instructor of German in the New Jersey College for Women, who had charged that his dismissal was inspired by the fact that he dared to voice anti-Nazi sentiments which were contrary to the beliefs of his superior, Dr. Johannes Hauptmann.

In announcing acceptance of the committee’s report, Dr. Robert C. Clothier, president of Rutgers, issued the following statement of explanation:

“In September, 1933, two years ago, Mr. Bergel, an instructor in the German department at the New Jersey College for Women, engaged on appointment from year to year, was informed that he would not be reappointed at the expiration of his contract on June 30, 1934.

“He was further informed, however, that in the event he could not secure another position by that time he would be continued until June 30, 1935, the limit allowed under the university standing rule which restricts instructors to three years of service unless, in that time, they are promoted to the rank of assistant professor.

“He was one of eight instructors whose contracts expired June 30, 1935, and who were not reappointed. The reasons for his failure to be reappointed were, first, that he could not be promoted, and second, that the enrollment in German was such that the department did not require the services of any one in his position.

“Not until the Winter of 1934-35, fifteen months after he had been informed that his contract would not be renewed, were allegations advanced that he failed of reappointment because he differed in political beliefs with the head of his department.”

NEXT STORY