Welfare Council Pledges American Jews to Aid German Emigration
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Welfare Council Pledges American Jews to Aid German Emigration

After pledging the American Jews to help raise the sums necessary to transfer 100,000 Jews from Germany, the 500 delegates of sixty-seven local communal agencies attending the National Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds closed their deliberations tonight.

A resolution was adopted recognizing the responsibility of the American Jews to help rehabilitate the Jews in Germany after Felix M. Warburg and Sir Herbert Samuel, spokesman for three British-Jewish leaders visiting the United States, outlined plans for aiding German Jews, particularly youths, to emigrate with the aid of gifts and loans.

Estimates of the funds needed for the undertaking indicated that about $10,000,000 would be raised in the United States and $5,000,000 in Britain. Sir Herbert assured the delegates that Britain would aid the emigration to Palestine and to British dominions and territories.

The resolution, introduced by William J. Shroder, president of the council, pledged its members to urge on their communities “the necessity for immediate and earnest efforts to raise the largest possible sums for the work of the Joint Distribution Committee and the United Palestine Appeal and for the sake of the victims of this awful tragedy.”

It condemned “the humiliation and degradation of the Jews in Germany.”

The action was taken in anticipation of the announcement of a concrete plan, details of which are still being worked out, in response to appeals from Sir Herbert, Mr. Warburg and Mr. Shroder.

Sir Herbert assured the delegates that there is no plan to “ransom” German Jews or to specifically help the wealthy. He quoted the report of James G. McDonald to the League of Nations to show the “terrible plight” of the German Jews.

He emphasized the necessity of transferring Jewish youths, “to bring them if possible to countries where they can fill their lungs with the fresh air of liberty and where they are free from discrimination and degradation.”

The main center of migration, Sir Herbert asserted, will be Palestine, assuring the delegates that the British Government was willing to cooperate. He promised that greater sums for emigration would be forthcoming from England and asked Americans to contribute more without jeopardizing local welfare.

Introducing Sir Herbert, Mr. Warburg said that if he were still Palestine High Commissioner there would be more peace between Arab and Jew.

The British delegation is devoting the next three months, Mr. Warburg stated, to working out a plan with American-Jewish leaders. “You will be asked,” he said, “when our plans in New York are perfected to go out and raise larger amounts than we had planned to do. I sincerely hope that you will do it.”

He urged wealthy Jews to “leave your children less and leave them the interest in these splendid German Jewish youngsters, who are entitled to a fair show.” He urged support of both the J.D.C. $3,500,000 appeal and the U.P.A. $2,500,000 campaign. He also asked large communities wherever possible to conduct the campaign jointly.

Mr. Warburg called upon every Jew with some means to help place German Jews after they arrive in this country.

At the opening session Sir Herbert and Mr. Warburg announced agreement on policy for the plan for expatriating German Jews. They stressed the need for large funds and appealed to the assembled philanthropic leaders for aid.

Other speakers during the assembly were Sidney Hollander of Baltimore, Mr. Younker, Joseph Willen of New York, Dr. I. M. Rubinow of Cincinnati and Harry L. Lurie of New York.

Officers elected Sunday for the coming year are: Mr. Shroder, president; Edward M. Baker of Cleveland and Ira M. Younker of New York, vice-presidents; Solomon Lowenstein of New York, treasurer and Henry Wineman of Detroit, secretary.