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Poland Asks League to Sponsor World Parley on Jewish Emigration

Poland today formally asked the League of Nations to sponsor an international emigration conference in November to take up its proposed solution of the Jewish problem in Central and Eastern Europe by mass emigration of Jews to Palestine and other lands.

The request was made before the second commission by the Polish delegation, which suggested the conference be hold under the auspices of the League’s International Labor Bureau.

It followed projection of the problem before the sixth commission on Tuesday by Tytus Komarnicki of Poland, who declared it was imperative to find other outlets than Palestine for the Jewish populations of Central and Eastern Europe.

Also addressing the sixth commission, the Turkish delegation today expressed the conviction that Great Britain could assure peace in the Holy Land (which it wrested from Turkey in the World War) by strict adherence to the Balfour Declaration, by which it was committed to assist in establishment of a Jewish national home in Palestine without prejudicing the status of existing communities.

The Turkish statement was coupled with pro-Zionist declarations by the representatives of the Little Entente.

As a result of the pro-Zionist statements, Arab Nationalists here induced Nuri Pasha as-Said, Iraq’s Foreign Minister, to expound the Arab views.

The Iraqi diplomat, who recently was unsuccessful in unofficial mediation efforts in the Palestine conflict, declared that when considering the possibility of Jewish immigration to the countries of the Near East, the rights of the inhabitants must be considered.

He deeply deplored the unrest in the Holy Land, “as the representative of a land bound to Palestine by race, speech and religion,” and voiced the hope that the Royal Commission, which has been appointed to investigate the underlying causes of the disorders, would find the right solution.

The foreign minister expressed approval of Poland’s proposal to seek a solution of the emigration problem of Polish Jewry.

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