Over Half of Hebrew U. Students “working Way Through”

“Working my way through college” is a major industry on Mount Scopus where more than half of the 675 Hebrew University students last year had outside jobs to support themselves while studying.

Precarious economic conditions interfere with students’ work at the university, a recent survey showed. Only 43 per cent of last year’s students had sufficient funds to support themselves without seeking outside sources of income.

The majority had various kinds of jobs. About 23 per cent worked as day laborers. Another 33 per cent of them made money as tutors. Nine per cent of the working students even served as housemaids.

A labor exchange has been set up by the Students’ Organization with the consent of the Histadruth, Jewish general federation of labor, which seeks to place the students in jobs.

Despite the money made by working, the students’ average living standard is low. A questionnaire prepared by the university administration revealed that about 35 per cent of the students had no more than $20 a month, while some 43 per cent had $20 to $35. Part of the student body–about eight per cent–had to help provide for their families.

The administration of the institution, seeking to aid the students, has placed well-equipped communal rooms at their disposal in a new club-house. It contributes three per cent of the income from students’ fees to the student-managed refectory.

Sick-relief has been established, and the university contributes regularly toward lodging expenses of needy students. It has established a special fund for long-term and short-term loans, as well as a number of prizes, scholarships and stipends.

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