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Czechoslovakian Purge of Jews Extended to Film Industry

The anti-Semitic drive in Czechoslovakia was extended to the film industry today, as the movement against Jews was pressed in the law and medical professions.

Although the question of elimination of Jews from the moving picture industry has not yet been decided by the trade, some firms have begun to dismiss Jewish employees. Twentieth Century-Fox Corp. transferred Brandfeld, manager of its distributing department here, to the United States. Gerstenberg, production manager of the Reiter (Czech) Film Company was dismissed with his consent.

The Czech lawyers’ Association in Brno decided to introduce the “Aryan clause” in its by-laws barring Jews as members. The German minority is demanding the dismissal of Jewish physicians from State hospitals.

An appeal to the Government to restore to the Jewish population a feeling of security was published by Dr. Emil Kafka, president of the Praha Jewish community, in the community’s organ, Vestnik. He declared that declarations issued by the Jewish authorities calculated to restore calm were not sufficient to allay the fears of the Jews, who were now eager to emigrate.

Meanwhile, the German authorities in Sudetenland have seized the property of Jews who have emigrated as security for payment of the “flight tax.” This measure is considered to be illegal since, according to German law, persons who left Sudetenland before Oct. 10 are exempt from payment of the “flight tax.”

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