French Anti-semites Told to Use More Subtle Tactics

Instructions to use more subtle tactics in spreading anti-Semitism in France have been issued to followers of Municipal Councillor Louis Darquier de Pellepoix, who is being held for trial under the law forbidding anti-Jewish agitation, according to a document reproduced by the Communist daily L’Humanite.

The document, signed by “Cel,” pseudonym of a French anti-Semitic journalist, proposes centralization of anti-Semitic propaganda in France and the employment of such tactics as impersonation of Jews in order to foment feeling against them. The newspaper L’Ordre reported that the authorities were convinced of the authenticity of the document and were determined to suppress such propaganda. Energetic steps against such incitement were demanded by L’Humanite in publishing the document.

“Cel” proposes in this document to establish in France a central organization for anti-Semitic propaganda headed by a “Fuehrer” entitled to issue orders to all anti-Semites in the country. This anti-Semitic propagandist, “Cel” writes, must not look like a Fascist or a Nazi, but rather like an honest Frenchman, and should be able even to appear as a Jew if circumstances should warrant such an appearance. It is no longer any use, “Cel” continue, to shout “Down with the Jews.” Rather it is necessary to shout “Long live the Jews! Down with Frenchmen” Such slogans posted or painted on walls would produce the required reaction from the mob.

The anti-Semitic propaganda in France, “Cel” continues, must adapt itself to the spirit of the French people. The anti-Semitic propagandist must be able, for instance, to persuade a French small tradesman that it is the Jew who is responsible for all his troubles. Among the shop-goers, however, it is necessary to spread such slogans as, “Buy only from Jews. The Frenchman only sells shoddy ware at high prices.” The result of such propaganda would be that the French shopkeepers would unite against the Jews.

As regards anti-Semitic propaganda in the cafes, “Cel” proposes that one propagandist, disguised as a Jew, should conduct a heated debate with a second one who would not conceal his identity. The “Jew” is to boast of his great influence in the French ministries and to speak with contempt of Frenchmen and French culture.

Similar propaganda is to be carried on among the French peasants and ex-servicemen. The ex-servicemen, for instance, are to be told that they owe their pensions to a Jewish minister, that the battle of the Marne was won by the Jews, that during the War their wives and children were fed by Jews and that they ought, therefore, to demand a Jewish regime in France.

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