Adler Transmits Roosevelt Peace Appeal to 2,000 Rabbis; Invites Suggestions

Dr. Cyrus Adler, president of the Jewish Theological Seminary, today sent copies of President Roosevelt’s peace appeal to the 2,000 rabbis throughout the country together with a letter inviting suggestions “with regard to the method and procedure to be followed in obtaining peace for the world.

Dr. Adler was selected by President Roosevelt as the representative of the Jewish faith in a move to organize the forces of religion for peace and alleviation of war suffering, and he, together with the Protestant representative, conferred with the President on Dec. 27.

Dr. Adler’s letter to the rabbis, made public by the seminary, follows:

“I am enclosing herewith a copy of the letter which the President sent me on December 23rd, and also a copy of the telegram which I sent to the President. The President is hoping that many people connected with our various religious bodies will actively spread the idea of peace, which he is voicing, I am sure, for many millions of people. I am sending a copy of his letter direct to you in the hope that you will make it known to the members of your congregation through the spoken word or through some publication which you may issue.

“I shall be very grateful for any suggestion you may make to me with regard to the method and procedure to be followed in attaining peace for the world. I am sure you will agree that every effort should be made to spread this idea, and that no time should be lost in doing so.”

Meanwhile, the executive board of the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, closing its annual meeting at the Temple Emanu-El Community House this afternoon, adopted a resolution commending President Roosevelt’s action, “which recognizes the significance of religion as the dominant force in the establishment of a new world order that shall achieve permanent peace and universal brotherhood.” The approximately 40 delegates approved the six-point peace program of the National Peace Conference, particularly a recommendation for a continuing conference of neutral nations, and called for increased emphasis on peace in religious education.

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