International Labor Conference Condemns Racial Discrimination in Totalitarian Lands

The International Labor Conference now meeting in New York with delegates from 33 countries present today adopted a resolution condemning racial and religious discrimination and reaffirming the belief that “such discriminations will be entirely excluded” after Hitler is defeated.

The resolution, which will be transmitted to the governing body of the International Labor Office, was adopted by the Conference unanimously. It was presented by Jan Masaryk and Jaromir Necas, delegates of the Czechoslovakian government, Mr. Paul Van Zeeland, delegate of the Belgium government, Mr. Van dan Temple, delegate of the Netherlands government, Mr. Li Ping Heng, delegate of the Chinese government and Mr. Carter Goodrich, delegate of the United States government.

The text of the resolution reads: “Whereas the charter of the International Labor Organization is based on social justice; whereas in consequence there should not be discrimination between working people whatever their political or religious belief or their national or racial origin; whereas at the present time many thousands of working people are enduring unspeakable sufferings inflicted upon them by the totalitarian governments solely because of their belief or of their origin, the Conference denouncing these inadmissible discriminations, reaffirms its confidence in the return in all countries, with the triumph of right, of a regime of social justice from which such discrimination will be entirely excluded.”

NEXT STORY