Jews of British Empire Mourn Today for Nazi Victims

Jews throughout the British Empire will observe Sunday as a day of mourning and prayer for the hundreds of thousands of Jews killed by the Nazis in Europe, while all Jewish newspapers in England appeared today with black borders.

All Jewish stores in England will be closed all day sunday in accordance with a joint appeal issued today by Chief Rabbi Hertz, the Board of Deputies of British Jews and the Rabbinate. This means that many Jewish enterprises will remain closed for two consecutive days, since a considerable number of Jewish shops in London are usually closed on Saturdays and open on sundays.

The women’s International Zionist Organization today addressed an appeal to all women throughout the world asking them to act “in order to avert the annihilation of the remaining Jewish men, women and children in Nazi Europe.” The appeal stressed the organization’s “mournful privilege” to speak in the names of thousands of its members who have been murdered by the Nazis.

In a pamphlet detailing the Nazi atrocities, which also incorporates exhaustive Jewish Telegraphic Agency reports of the reaction in Palestine and throughout the world, the British Poale-Zion organization urges that the following measures be taken by the allied nations: Broadcast warning of reprisals to Germany: provide financial assistance for refugees from Nazi-dominated lands who are able to reach neutral or friendly countries: save the Jewish children; open the gates of Palestine and the British Empire to Jewish immigrants; allow Jews to fight under their own flag.

The Manchester Guardian, in an editorial commenting on the fate of the Jews in Nazi-occupied countries suggests that “international machinery be established to help resoue those Jews and non-Jews who can flee to friendly countries.” It also suggests broadcasting appeals urging non-Jews everywhere to render all possible assistance to escaping Jews. “Our protests must be translated into action – such action can only be government action,” the paper writes.

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