Leading British Newspapers Urge Palestine Partition; Ask Urgent Action by Government

The two most influential newspapers in Britain the London Times and the Manchester Guardian–today suggest that the only feasible solution of the Palestine problem is to partition the country into Jewish and Arab states.

In an editorial commenting on Dr. Weizmann’s attack, yesterday, on the policy of the Labor Government regarding Palestine, the Guardian says that the “most practical solution still seems to be the creation of a small, but independent, Jewish state by the partition of Palestine, combined with a more generous immigration policy by other countries.”

A Times correspondent writes that the political deadlock in Palestine is complete and “therefore the recommendations of partition, which is not ideal, but which would involve the smallest amount of injustice to the two partners, is the greatest hope for political stability today, and as valid as it was eight years ago.”

The Guardian, declaring that while some of Dr. Weizmann’s criticisms were just, and others unjust “but understandable,” commends the reported government decision to seek United Nations approval of a permanent solution of the problem. Referring to the Jewish Agency’s rejection of the offer of 1,500 immigration certificates monthly, the liberal daily says that “the Government should realize that no continuation of the White Paper policy will satisfy the Jews, or do anything but prolong unrest in Palestine.” It also urges the Government to do everything possible to improve the conditions of the displaced Jews in Germany.

The formation of the Arab League and the emergence of a “Jewish underground movement of considerable striking force” make it obvious that nothing can be gained by further postponement of a solution, the article in the Times stresses, adding that the Palestine problem must be placed among the urgent matters on the Government’s Middle East agenda. Discussing the land regulations in Palestine, it says that little of the Arab peasants’ land is being purchased, and that the restrictions which prohibit Jews from buying land in ninety-five percent of the country are “hardly justifiable.”

Vernon Bartlett, Independent member of Parliament, writing in the News Chronicle, says that the members of the Labor Government are torn “between their sympathies and their view of what is practicable.” He expresses doubts whether President Truman’s appeal to Prime Minister Attlee for 100,000 immigration certificates will help matters, since, Bartlett continues, it may only intensify the strain in Palestine and lessen the influence of moderates on both sides. He emphasizes that while the reported plan to refer the problem to the United Nations is reasonable, the council of the UNO exists only on paper as yet.

NEXT STORY