British Government Welcomes Thousand’s Formation of Cabinet Committee on Palestine

A communique issued today by the British Foreign Office states that the British Government welcomes President Truman’s formation of a cabinet Committee on Palestine and Related Problems.

“His Majesty’s Government are glad to learn that a group of American officials representing the President’s committee is about to arrive in London for discussions on the recommendations of the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry regarding the problems of European Jewry and Palestine,” the communique says. For the purpose of these conversations, His Majesty’s Government have nominated a delegation of British officials drawn from the departments concerned under the chairmanship of Sir Norman Brook.

“The conversations will cover matters arising on each of the ten recommendations in the committee of inquiry’s report. The two groups of officials will have before them, in the course of their discussions, the statements which have been invited from the Arab Governments, the Jewish Agency for Palestine and other Jewish and Arab organizations.

“His Majesty’s Government will await the result of the conversations between British and American officials before determining their policy in relation to the recommendations of the Anglo-American committee. But they are most anxious that no time should be lost in pressing on with a constructive solution of this most difficult problem.”

A Foreign Office spokesman said the communique was “a useful corrective to suggestions in the United States that Mr. Bevin had suggested that he did not mean to carry out the recommendations of the report.”

The spokesman issued “an authentic text” of Bevin’s speech to the Labor Party conference, conceding that it varied a little from the published version. He commented that “certain misunderstandings in the United States may possibly be accounted for by over-condensed reports.”

He declared there was no intention of denying that Bevin attributed United States agitation toward admission of the 100,000 Jews to lack of desire to have “too many of them in New York.” He added, however, that the latter remark was “made jestingly as an aside.”

The advance group of American technical experts, which arrived here today to discuss various problems concerning the implementation of the Anglo-American committee report on Palestine, will start its work between June 18 and 20, it was stated by Foreign Office officials.

NEXT STORY