Ship Brings 600 More Jews to Cyprus; Labor Group Protests Dumping of Jews on Island

A protest against British “dumping” of Jews on the island of Cyprus was formally lodged today in a memorandum from the Cyprus Federation of Labor to the British governor objecting to “permanent or temporary settlement of Jews in Cyprus” on the grounds that such a policy may effect the island’s food supplies.

Meanwhile, the deportation ship Empire Heywood, which left Haifa on Friday after being delayed a week by sabotage, arrived at Famagusta today and began disembarking 600 visaless immigrants, including 370 men, 219 women and 11 children. The landings were orderly and no guards were present while the deportees were escorted from the dock to the detention camp.

The immigrants were wearing khaki clothes which had been given them on shipboard to replace those ruined during the clashes which occurred at Haifa when British marines came to transfer them from their own vessel to the British troop ship. Tear gas and water hoses had been used before they were subdued. They said that they had been well treated on the Heywood, but had been confined in the hold of the ship during their five-day journey except for toilet purposes, when they were permitted on deck in pairs.

BRITISH AUTHORITIES REJECT J.D.C. AID FOR JEWISH INTERNEES

The local camp authorities today refused the offer of the Joint Distribution Committee’s Palestine representative to provide assistance for the deportees. The offer, which was made to “dispel the feeling of prison,” included provision of nurses, teachers and welfare workers. British officials stated that the deportees already had some medical personnel from among their own group. They also asserted that the refugees were permitted to listen to radios, attend weekly cinema shows and receive mail and newspapers. Although provision has been made for censoring outgoing mail, the British say they have not yet applied censorship.

M.V. Spurway, acting Chief Assistant Colonial Secretary on Cyprus, declared that although the length of the prisoners’ stay on the island was not yet known, the question of more permanent winter quarters for them was being discussed.

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