Hearings on Stration Bill Conclude with Testimony by Attorney-general Tom Clark

House hearings on the Stratton Bill ended this (##)ning with testimony by Attorney-General Tom Clark, who strongly supported the measure.

Clark told the House Sub-Committee on Immigration that “practically every person who appeared in support of this bill presented his facts and views on the bas(##) of actual experience or first-hand acquaintance with the subject,” while most of (##) opposition witnesses had based their testimony on a long-standing prejudice to immigration itself.

He urged the Committee to bear such prejudices in mind in determing the weight which should be given to their utterances in opposition to this bill. “As a lawyer, feel justified in saying that these witnesses lack qualification to state essential facts and lack the qualification of expert witnesses,” Clark charged.

Refuting charges that admission of 400,000 displaced persons, as provided by (##) Stratton Bill, would take jobs away from American workers, Clark cited the testimony of A.F.L. President William Green and CIO President Philip Murray on behalf (##) the measure. He reiterated that there was no intention of changing the basic immigration law of the U.S.

Earl G. Harrison, chairman of the Citizens Committee on Displaced Persons, last (##)ght charged that a move is being made in the Senate to stall action on the entry (##) displaced persons in America “for two years at least, possibly until they are (##)ad.” Mr. Harrison said that Senate Resolution 137, introduced by Sen. Chapman (##)vercomb, Republican of W. Va., on July 11 on the floor of the Senate for action, (##)ill, if passed, hopelessly entangle the displaced persons problem in Congressional investigation, red-tape, fumble and delay.”

Rep. Frank Fellows, yesterday in the House introduced a resolution similar to senator Revercomb’s, calling for an investigation of the immigration system.

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