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Jewish Refugees Adjust Themselves Speedily to American Life, Rosenwald Reports

Survivors of Nazi persecution and war, who have come to the United States since the end of the war, are making an excellent adjustment, William Rosenwald, honorary president of United Service for New Americans and national chairman of the United Jewish Appeal, declared in an address tonight at the Greater New York Regional Conference held by United Service here. The newcomers are distributed throughout the country and are well on their way to becoming good Americans, he said, adding that “thousands are already usefully employed and self-sustaining.”

The conference was also addressed by Geoffrey Lewis, U.S. State Department Coordinator of Displaced Persons, and by Rep. Jacob K. Javits, member of the House Foreign Affairs Sub-Committee dealing with refugee problems. “My recent trip to Europe,” Rep. Javits said, “convinces me more than ever of the need for action on the Stratton Bill. The need of the DP’s is so urgent, and our responsibility so great that we must pass special legislation without delay. The Stratton Bill to admit 400,000 DP’s – 100,000 a year for four years – is such a bill.”

By welcoming refugee newcomers as “new neighbors” and aiding them to start on the road to normal life and American citizenship, the people support the government in its efforts to bring about a solution of the worldwide problem of displaced persons, Mrs. Norman S. Goetz, first vice-president of United Service for New Americans and president of the New York Section of the National Council of Jewish Women, told the Conference. “It is our responsibility as an organized community to see that the refugees are provided with whatever assistance is necessary to speed their adjustment,” she said.

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