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United States Grants De Jure Recognition to Israel; Exchange of Ambassadors Expected

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The U.S. Government today granted full recognition to the state of Israel. Simultaneously, it granted de jure recognition to Transjordan.

A statement issued by the White House reads: “On Oct. 24, 1948, the President stated that when a permanent government was elected in Israel, it would promptly be given de jure recognition. Elections for such a government were held on Jan. 25th. The votes have been counted, and this government has been officially informed of the results. The United States Government is, therefore, pleased to extend de jure recognition to the government of Israel as of this date.”

The statement with regard to the recognition of Transjordan reads: “For some time informal and friendly relations have existed between the United States Government and the Government of the Kingdom of Transjordan. Consistently with its feeling of friendship for Transjordan, the United States Government has supported that country for membership in the United Nations. Today the United States Government has extended de jure recognition to the Government of Trans Jordan.

Presidential press secretary Charles G. Ross, in response to questioning, that it was not yet known who would be chosen as U.S. Ambassador to Israel. It 113 understood that within a few days there will be an exchange of ambassadors between the two countries. At present James G. MacDonald is special representative of the U.S. to the state of Israel while Eliahu Epstein is Israeli’s special representative to the United States.

President Truman signed the order granting de jure recognition to Israel in the presence of Frank Goldman, national president of the B’nai B’rith, Maurice Bysgyer national secretary of the B’nai B’rith, and Eddie Jacobson, his former business City.

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