U.N. Congress Hears of Fate of Jewish Child Survivors of Nazis

The toll of Nazi cruelty on some of the 150,000 Jewish children found in Europe at the end of World War II was described here today by Bernard B. Gillis, vice-chairman of the British section of the World Jewish Congress, speaking at the first United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Delinquents.

Mr. Gillis noted that the children found in concentration camps and elsewhere in the liberated countries were all suffering from malnutrition and many from the effect of starvation, had witnessed Nazi cruelties and had been forced to do revolting work. In the 12-16 year-old group, he said, many youths were restless and their attitude toward life included in various cases fury, destruction, cruelty and a desire to inflict on others some of the torment and humiliation that had been their lot.

Of the fate of the 150,000, he said, very few were re-united with remnants of their families, many thousands were given a new start in Israel and others in other countries.

NEXT STORY