British Govt. Rejects Laborite Demand for Israel Arms, Treaty

A demand by Labor Party leader Herbert Morrison that Britain give Israel arms and a security guarantee similar to pacts concluded with some of the Arab states was rejected in Parliament today by Anthony Nutting, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs.

Mr. Morrison asked the Eden Government to “face up” to the arms race in the Middle East and to “recognize that Israel is entitled to fair treatment.” The pact he suggested would guarantee Israel’s borders.

Mr. Nutting replied that this was not the moment for such a guarantee. He said that in the matter of supplying arms Britain had and would continue to do so only within the framework of the Tripartite Declaration of 1950. He said he felt that document was clear and “more automatic” in its implementation than most international agreements.

The Minister of State rejected Labor charges that Maj. Gen. E. L. M. Burns, U.N. truce supervision chief in Palestine, had failed in his mission to lessen tension there. The British envoys in Israel and Egypt were instructed today to notify the two governments that Britain associated herself with Gen. Burns’ plea to obey the armistice terms.

(At the United Nations today, Gen. Burns said the tense Middle East situation “requires action by the Great Powers.” He declined to specify the exaction required but confirmed that he had discussed the situation with the British and American delegations Saturday.

(Gen. Burns revealed at the press conference that he would go to London before proceeding to Jerusalem. There was considerable speculation here today that he might also go to Geneva to confer with the Foreign Ministers of the United States, Britain France.

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