Khrushchev Delegate De Inclined to “moderate” His Policy on Jews

Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev will not permit Jewish emigration from the Soviet Union, but may “moderate” the Soviet policy of anti-Jewish discrimination, it is predicted in next week’s issue of Newsweek, the weekly magazine.

The prediction is made by the publication’s experts on Soviet affairs, Leon Volkov, in connection with the possibility that the Soviet Premier may agree to see a delegation of American Jewish leaders during his visit next month in this country. Mr. Volkov believes that Khrushchev may receive such a delegation with whom he would discuss the situation of Soviet Jewry providing the American Jewish community “can agree on the make-up of a three-or-four-man delegation.” He adds that “picking a delegation, however, will not be as easy as it sounds.”

Explaining why he believes that Moscow will not permit emigration of Soviet Jews, the Newsweek experts writes: “Russia still needs the services of Jewish scientists, technicians and other professionals, however much it restricts their opportunities.” On the other hand, easing of the anti-Jewish policy in the USSR “would cost Khrushchev nothing, and would redound to his credit around the world at a tine when the Soviets are studiously courting public opinion,” he points out.

“American Jews,” declares the Newsweek article, “are not only divided in their attitude toward Zionism, but profess widely varying political viewpoints. They also disagree about other questions such as the manner in which is appropriate Russians. These differences are obstacles in arranging a meeting with Khrushchev. However nebulous all this sounds, the prospect that American Jewish leaders may soon sit down with Khrushchev has raised hopes that something at last will be done to improve the lot of Soviet Jews.”

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