U.S. Study Recommends Expansion of Electronics Industry in Israel

A study carried out in Israel for the Agency for International Development of the United States for a Stanford Research Institute team has established that conditions exist in Israel for the development of an expanded electronics industry, it was reported here today.

An initial finding by the Stanford research team was the presence of a widening gap between Israel’s experts and imports of electronic goods. In 1960, Israel imported nearly $8,000,000 more of electronic equipment than was exported. By 1961, the deficit was $12,700,000 and an 1962, it is expected to reach $17,800,000. The Stanford report noted, therefore, that “a growing local market for electronics obviously exists,” and that “a healthy electronics manufacturing capability could possibly satisfy part of the market, save the foreign exchange now expended, and produce major items for export.”

The Stanford survey also found that “the conditions specifically suitable” for the electronics industry “are to be found in Israel.” The country has six trade schools which turn out 200 electronics technicians annually. Some 75 electronics engineers and physicists are graduated each year in Israel, while several others graduate from schools abroad. “Moreover,” the Stanford report noted, “there are many fine research institutions which could add support to electronics manufacturing.”

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