American Jewish Committee Urges U.S. Efforts to Insure Mid-east Peace

The American Jewish Committee ended its 56th annual meeting here today with a resolution calling on the United States Government to “intensify efforts” to end the arms race in the Middle East and to guarantee the borders of all states in the region. A.M. Sonnabend, of Boston, was re-elected president of the AJC as the three-day session was concluded.

The resolution on the Middle East urged a five-point program which the U.S. should implement in its policy in that regard. The AJC urged that the U.S.A.:

“1. Clearly define what it would consider ‘aggression’; 2. Intensify efforts to end the arms race in the area, meanwhile assuring that the balance of arms is not upset; 3. Provide a formal guarantee, upon request, of the independence and integrity of any state in the region; 4. Vigorously discourage the violent hate campaigns against Israel conducted by the Arab states; and 5. Re-evaluate the present U.S. policy of impartiality between peaceful nations and those nations pursuing belligerent policies inimical to the peace and stability of the Middle East.”

In another resolution, the committee urged the West German Government to utilize “existing legal and administrative means” to prevent its scientists from contributing “to the war potential of the United Arab Rebpublic.” The statement cited “evidence that many of the Germans employed by the United Arab Republic are pro-Nazi and have expressed strong anti-democratic sentiments. The resolution stated:

“The AJC feels that the efforts of Western scientists and technicians to create a more powerful war machine has exacerbated tensions in the Middle East. These activities have increased the danger of an accelerated Middle East arms race which may lead to war.”

STEVENSON, SLAWSON, ADDRESS PARLEY; OTHER TOP OFFICERS CHOSEN

Adlai E. Stevenson, chief United States delegate to the United Nations, delivered one of the parley’s principal addresses last night when he was awarded the AJC “American Liberties” medallion. He denounced racial bigotry. The presentation was made by a previous recipient of the medallion, Jacob Blaustein, of Baltimore, honorary president of the American Jewish Committee. The organization’s Institute of Human Relations Award was presented by Judge Joseph M. Proskauer to Leonard Goldenson, of the American Broadcasting Company.

Other major addresses were delivered by Mr. Sonnabend; Morris B. Abram; and Dr. John Slawson, executive vice president of the Committee. Dr. Slawson, declaring that racial and religious bigotry in this country presented “a major mental health problem,” urged that the Federal Government enlist the experience and knowledge of community relations agencies “in mounting a nationwide investigation of the psychological roots of group tensions.”

Other top officers chosen today or re-elected, in addition to Mr. Connabend, were the following: Mr. Abram as chairman of the executive board; Ralph Friedman, chairman of the administrative board; William Rosenwald, chairman of the national advisory council; Maurice Glineit, treasurer; Arthur D. Leidesdorf, associate treasurer; Crin Lehman, secretary; and Dr. Slawson, executive vice-president. Named as vice-presidents were: Ely M. Aaron; Max William Bay of Beverly Hills; Irving L. Goldberg of Dallas; Philip E. Hoffman of Newark; Richard Maass of White Plains; Norman S. Rabb of Boston; Joseph Ross of Detroit and Leonard M. Sperry of Los Angeles.

Re-elected as honorary presidents were Mr. Blaustein, Louis Caplan of Pittsburgh; Herbert B. Ehrmann of Boston; Irving M. Engel; and Judge Proskauer. Honorary vice-presidents are: former Senator Herbert H. Lehman, Samuel D. Leidesdorf, James Marshall, Ralph E. Samuel, Horace Stern. Honorary chairman of the national advisory council is Fred Lazarus, Jr. of Cincinnati.

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