Menu JTA Search

Immigration to Israel Endorsed at Two Zionist Meetings in London

British Labor Zionists and Orthodox groups today pledge their support for all efforts for settlement by British Jews in Israel at meetings of various organizations devoted to immigration, and addressed by S. Z. Shragal, head of the Jewish agency immigration department.

The British Labor Zionists voiced support for immigration to Israel after Dr. S. Levenber? Labor Zionist chairman here, reported that 15,000 British Jews have settled in Israel since the establishment of the State. He said that more than 700 members of the Young Poale Zion were among the settlers. In the resolution adopted at the meeting, the delegates reiterated “whole-hearted” support for immigration as the “central task of the Labor Zionist movement” in Britain.

At a meeting sponsored by the British Mizrachi Federation, delegates representing various Mizrachi groups as well as the Federation of Synagogues, the Religious Students Organization and the Association of Orthodox Jewish Scientists, adopted a resolution terming immigration “the call of the hour and the duty of this generation.” The resolution urged every religious Jew to “make an effort to settle in Israel.”

SHRAGAI STRESSES URGENT NEED FOR NEWCOMERS FROM WESTERN LANDS

The shift in Israel’s economy from farming to industry as the main prop of the economy has increased the need for immigration from Western countries, Mr. Shragai told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency here today. “We are now in great need of manpower for industry,” he said, “and we will obviously not find the necessary skills in countries with distressed Jewish communities in urgent need of migration to Israel.” He said this was the reason his department was seeking migrants “from free countries with prosperous Jewish communities.”

He said that, since Jews in such countries felt no security reasons for migrating to Israel, two other factors would have to be depended on. One of them, he said, was anxiety of Jews for the fate of Israel if suitable manpower failed to arrive from other countries. The other is the assurance of reasonable living conditions for immigrants “who are used to a fairly high standard,” he said.

He noted that a new settler now could get an apartment by a down payment of from $100 to $333, paying off the rest with a loan from the Jewish Agency for 30 years at 6 percent. He reported also that his department was arranging talks between skilled Jews in other countries and Israeli industrialists. He said such industrialists were offering three year contracts to such newcomers and to cover their expenses.

NEXT STORY