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Nixon Congratulates Israel. Expresses Sadness over Mideast Conflict

President Richard M. Nixon said in an Independence Day message to President Shazar today that like “so many peace-loving men and women throughout the world,” he was “deeply disturbed and saddened by the conflict that has marred the great success you have attained.” President Nixon met President Shazar when the latter attended the funeral of former President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

He said in his message: “My warmest congratulations go out to you and your people on the occasion of the 21st anniversary of the State of Israel. As so many of my fellow Americans, I deeply admire the accomplishments your country has realized in the course of its young life. Adversity has been your challenge as you have pressed forward in the face of overwhelming odds toward progress and well-being for your citizens. But, as so many peace-loving men and women throughout the world, I too am deeply disturbed by the conflict that has marred the great success you have attained. So, on this anniversary of your nation, I also join with you–and with all men of good will–in the fervent hope that peace may soon accompany the prosperity you enjoy.”

The letter was read by Rabbi Israel Miller, chairman of the American Zionist Council, today at the Felt Forum of Madison Square Garden in New York at a celebration.

21ST ANNIVERSARY MARKED IN CITIES ACROSS THE GLOBE

(In Albany, N.Y., Gov, Nelson A. Rockefeller proclaimed the week of April 20 “Israel Independence Week” in New York State. The Governor’s proclamation hailed the people of Israel who “won their freedom in the face of obstacles which most people believed to be insurmountable.” In a telephone call to Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem, Mayor John V. Lindsay of New York conveyed anniversary greetings and expressed the hope of New Yorkers for a strong and secure Israel that would live in peace and prosperity.

(In Philadelphia, Mayor James H.J. Tate yesterday proclaimed Israel Independence Day in that city at a ceremony in Independence Hall. He received from Consul-General Yissakhar Ben-Yaacov a golden medal struck at the Franklin Mint in honor of the occasion. It symbolized a sister-cities relationship with Tel Aviv. He said that Philadelphia would name a street or square in Tel Aviv’s honor, and Mr. Ben-Yaacov announced that Tel Aviv would reciprocate.

(The Board of Deputies of British Jews held a special meeting in London to mark Israel’s anniversary. One speaker, Sir Henry d’Avigdor-Goldsmid, decried attempts to create a breach between Israel and Diaspora Jewry. He said, “Today anti-Semitism is a mark of shame, but to be anti-Israel is merely to express an opinion. Israel is no longer an underdog and we are proud that she can stand on her own feet.”)

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