Ex-gestapo Chief Sentenced to Life Imprisonment for Slaying Jews; Aides Are Freed

A Dusseldorf court has sentenced Karl Rudolf Pallmann, onetime Gestapo officer, to life imprisonment after it found him guilty of having issued the order for the shooting of more than 100 Jews in the Crimea in 1942. Five others, who stood trial with Pallman, and who had been accused of complicity, were set free under the provision of the statute of limitations which barred punishment of those held to have committed murder in obedience to orders.

In Frankfurt, the state prosecutor has demanded life imprisonment for S.S. Col. Hermann Krumey, 64, a chief aide to Adolf Eichmann, for his role in the deportation and murder of 300,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II. The prosecutor asked a 15-year sentence for Otto Hunsche, 58, another Eichmann aide. The pair have been on trial since June 1968 at the direction of the Karlsruhe appeals court who ordered them to stand trial for a second time after a previous trial resulted in a five-year sentence for Krumey and acquittal for Hunsche.

At Baden Baden, bail was cancelled for Helmut Reinhard, former Gestapo chief in Norway, and he was rearrested after the Baden Baden high court ordered him retried by a jury in Karlsruhe on charges of having ordered the deportation of more than 500 Norwegian Jews to the death camps. Reinhard had been sentenced in an earlier trial to five years imprisonment but the prosecutor had appealed this as too lenient. Reinhard had argued in his defense that he did not know at the time that deportation meant death to the Jews.

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