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75 Nations to Sign Israeli Proposed Amendment to Patent Cooperation Treaty

An amendment, proposed by Israel, has been incorporated into the international Patent Cooperation Treaty that will be signed by 75 nations in ceremonies at the State Department tomorrow. The amendment is not only of considerable value to Israel and many developing nations but represents a major diplomatic victory scored by Israel’s two delegates at the month-long meeting on the treaty–Mayer Gabay. Israel’s Commissioner of Patents and Deputy Attorney General. Zeev Sher. Mr. Gabay was congratulated by the Soviet delegate on passage of the amendment. It was actively supported by such countries as Brazil, Argentina, Yugoslavia and the African states, some of which are politically anti-Israel. The Israeli delegates were included in the small study groups on major parts of the treat–something that rarely happens at other international organization meetings owing to Communist and Arab opposition. Mr. Gabay attributed the success to the fact that the Israeli delegation ignored politics and concentrated on professional and personal relationships. The treaty makes it easier for investors to receive international patents by providing for an international file and only one place where patents have to be tested to see if they are really new and if they work. The Israeli amendment added a provision which would allow any country or individual to request information on all international or national patents in any field. Mr. Gabay explained that the amendment would make all information on new developments available to the countries that need them most – the developing countries. “We felt it had to cover the needs of the developing countries. It would help industry in many countries by putting industries in touch with inventors who could explain their inventions and might even be willing to invest in the small countries for production,” Mr. Gabay said.

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