Yost: Un’s Inability to Find Solution to Mideast Conflict Due to Israel, Arabs

Ambassador Charles W. Yost, United States envoy to the United Nations, said today that the “attitude of the parties (Israel and the Arabs) primarily” was to blame for the UN’s inability to find a solution to the Middle East conflict in 1970 as compared with its success in 1957 following the Suez campaign. Appearing on the NBC television program “Meet the Press” Mr. Yost said both Israelis and Arabs accepted the UN Security Council’s Nov. 22, 1967 Mideast resolution “but they interpret it differently.” He said “the Four Powers can take new initiatives, and they will, but whether the parties will carry them out is another question.” Asked in what regard the U.S. held the 1967 resolution at this juncture Mr. Yost replied. “That’s our Bible.” The resolution calls for Israel’s withdrawal from the occupied Arab territories in return for Arab peace undertakings.

Mr. Yost said the Four Powers–United States, Soviet Russia, Britain and France–were working “earnestly and diligently” on the Mideast crisis and he expected “a forward movement” in the near future with respect to the peace-seeking mission of special UN envoy Gunnar V. Jarring and progress in general. Ambassador Yost said he thought the Soviet Union would prefer a “substantial cooling off” in the Mideast because they see “very serious hazards for themselves and for peace generally.” He said there was evidence that the Palestinian guerrillas were getting Soviet arms but it was not known whether they were receiving them directly or through another source. Mr. Yost said he thought the growing power of the Palestinians was a “very seriously complicating factor” in implementing the Nov. 1967 resolution. He said the “major aim” of the U.S. was to re-enforce the UN’s peace-keeping. Mr. Yost declined to say whether any decision has been reached yet on Israel’s request for more American jets.

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