Four U.S. Tourists Among 15 Hurt in Grenade Attack in East Jerusalem

Fifteen persons including four American tourists were injured last night when a hand grenade exploded in the Dolphin restaurant in East Jerusalem, an establishment owned Jointly by Arabs and Jews. Police reported the arrests of several dozen suspects. Three of the Americans were identified as Donald and Catherine Grant and their son, Harry from Chicago. Their injuries were described as slight. One Arab boy was seriously injured. A second grenade that exploded in a nearby bakery caused no casualties. Eye-witnesses said the attacker hurled the grenade from the doorway of the restaurant into the middle of the dining area. They said his face was partly hidden by an undershirt. A nearby restaurant, also owned by Arabs and Jews, was the target of a grenade attack three months ago. One curfew breaker was killed and another was injured in Raffah during the past 24 hours when they disregarded orders to halt. The curfew was imposed on the Gaza Strip town and three nearby refugee camps because only they cooperated on the general strike called by the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine to protest Israel’s arrest of 450 Arabs suspected on collaborating with the PFLP, all of whom have since been released.

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