Russian Warns of Anti-semitism in U.s., Ussr, if Trade Bill is Blocked

G.A.Arhatov, a Soviet authority on the United States, told American business leaders here last night that anti-Semitism will arise in the U.S. and in the Soviet Union if Congressional legislation aimed at removing Soviet restrictions on emigration blocks the pending Soviet-American trade agreement.

Arbatov, director of the Institute for U.S. Studies at the USSR Academy of Sciences in Moscow, also warned that if “normalization” of trade relations between the two countries does not result it would be “a harmful thing for Soviet-American relations as a whole,” and would have “serious political repercussions.” He indicated Jews would be blamed for those circumstances.

His threats came at a briefing session for the press and many of the approximately 806 businessmen at the two-day U.S.-Soviet trade conference at the Shoreham Hotel sponsored by the National Association of Manufacturers with the backing of both the Soviet and American governments. The briefing was held to report on the discussions by panels behind closed doors on various topics concerning “advantages and pitfalls” of U.S. trade with the USSR. A 15-member Soviet trade delegation is attending the conference along with more than a score of Soviet Embassy officials. They are participating in the discussions.

Arbatov predicted that the proposed Congressional legislation “would revive anti-Semitism in the Soviet Union” because it would give “Soviet Jews a special status and treatment.” He added: “We have to think not only of that part of the Jewish population that wishes to go to Israel–three or four percent–but also of the more than 90 percent who want to stay. They would not feel good if they were put in an unfavorable light.”

He warned-that “if this question (Soviet emigration) becomes really insurmountable” this “would spur anti-Semitism in the United States itself” because many would use it “as a pretext against the SALT talks and detente.”

Two Israeli soldiers were slightly injured yesterday when their vehicle struck a mine near Sheikh Zueld in northern Sinal. Security forces are searching the area for terrorists who may have planted the mine.

Hafez Ismail, President Anwar Sadat’s personal envoy, is due in Bonn today for three days of talks with Chancellor Willy Brandt and other top West German officials. The Egyptian diplomat, who met with President Nixon in Washington last Friday, is expected to discuss the possibilities of a peaceful settlement in the Middle East, Foreign Office sources said today. The sources made it clear that while Bonn wants a peaceful settlement in the Middle East, it is not interested in playing the role of mediator and insists that a settlement should be based on the Security Council’s Resolution 242.

The Warsaw Yiddish Theater announced today that it will tour West Germany during the latter half of March. The tour has been organized by a German impressario from Duesseldorf and will offer a musical comedy based on Abraham Goldfaden’s early musical comedies, titled “A Goldfaden Dream.” The play has been produced by the veteran Yiddish actor, Jacob Rotbaum.

The Board of Delegates of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Pacific Region, representing all facets of the British Columbia Jewish community, sent telegrams to United Nations Secretary General Kurt Waldheim and Canada’s Minister of External Affairs Mitchell Sharp expressing “horror and anguish” about the reported executions of nine Jews in Iraq. The telegrams, signed by I.M. Wolfe, chairman of the CJC, Pacific Region, stated in part: “We call on you to use your good offices to raise this matter with the Iraqi government either directly or indirectly to learn the exact fate of the nine Iraqi Jews” and the Jewish community.

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