Israel Prize in Medicine for 1985 Awarded to Two Tel Avivu. Scientists

Two Tel Aviv University scientists have been awarded the 1985 Israel Prize — the country’s most prestigious award — in medicine, it was announced here this week by Leonard Strelitz, chairman of the University’s international board of governors. The laureates are Prof. Henry Neufeld, selected for his achievements in cardiology, and Prof. Baruch Padeh, for his pioneering achievements in public health.

The Israel Prize, presented annually on Independence Day by the President, is given in the fields of science, medicine, the humanities, biblical studies and the performing arts.

Neufeld, born in Poland in 1923, is one of Israel’s leading cardiologists. After completing his medical studies in Austria, he emigrated to Israel in 1951. He was a visiting professor at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. for several years.

Neufeld helped develop the cardiology department at Tel Aviv University’s Sackler School of Medicine and served as department chairman. He is vice president of the International Society of Cardiology, served as chief scientist of Israel’s Ministry of Health, president of the Israel Heart Association and president of the Asian-Pacific Society of Cardiology.

Padeh was born in Belorussia in 1908 and emigrated to Palestine in 1934. A leader in the field of internal medicine, he helped develop Tel Aviv University’s medical school and served as chairman of its department of genetics. He was a founder of the medical corps of Israel’s Defense Forces and the Institute for Chromosome Research.

Padeh retired in 1974 but has continued to work in community medicine and has served as a medical consultant to settlements in Israel’s northern Galilee region.

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