Gypsies Killed by Nazis Will Have Niche in Holocaust Museum

Gypsies, at least a half million of whom were killed by the Nazis, will have a niche at the Holocaust Museum at Kibbutz Lohamei Hageta’ot (the Ghetto Fighters Kibbutz) north of Acre.

Miriam Novich, a veteran member of the museum staff, has collected hundreds of documents and photographs attesting to the genocide of the Gypsies by the Nazis during World War II. They were rounded up from all over Europe. Many perished at Auschwitz, the most notorious of the Nazi death camps.

The museum will be the largest repository of this evidence. As a spokesperson explained, the Gypsies, whose origins as a people remain obscure to this day, were for many centuries transients in most European countries. They have no homeland of their own and no public body anywhere has documented Nazi crimes against them. The material collected by Novich includes orders signed by gestapo chief Heinrich Himmler for the destruction of the Gypsies and progress reports on how this was carried out. Relevant documents published since World War II will also be on display.

NEXT STORY