‘guide for the Jewish Traveler’ Issued by Aerolineas Argentinas

Aerolineas Argentinas has issued a 24-page illustrated “Guide for the Jewish Traveler” describing sites of general and Jewish interest– synagogues, organizations, restaurants, clubs — in Buenos Aires and eight other Argentine cities.

The brochure, authored by travel specialist Milton Jacoby, was officially showcased at an Aerolineas Argentinas reception for several dozen Jewish communal leaders last week at the airline’s New York offices. It is available free from the airline upon request.

At the gathering. Arturo Muzzio Aerolineas Argentinas’ general manager for North and Central America, shared his vision of tourism between the U.S. and Argentina building bridges between the two most populous Jewish communities in the western hemisphere. Along similar lines, Rabbi William Berkowitz, president of the American Jewish Heritage Committee, spoke of the bonds of democracy between the two countries and the American realization of the need to reach out to the countries beyond the U.S. borders.

The brochure, 50,000 of which have already been distributed, begins with a brief history of the 250,000-strong Jewish community in Argentina and the waves of 19th-century immigration that brought Jews from Western and Eastern Europe and the Middle East to the country.

In addition to the tourist attractions of general interest in Buenos Aires, the brochure describes the network of Jewish organizations, schools, synagogues, theaters, libraries, press and clubs. It provides, as well, addresses and phone numbers of all these institutions, with descriptions of each.

Other cities featured in the brochure include Cordoba, Mar del Plata, Mendoza, Salta, Tucuman, Bariloche and Rosario, with details on their Jewish communities. Also listed is the town of Moisesville, founded with other agricultural settlements sponsored by Baron de Hirsch in the late 1880′s. Moisesville is the location of the famed Jewish gauchos (cowboys) and farmers, 500 of whose descendants still live in the provincial town.

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