Police Investigating Deaths of Two Suspected Collaborators

Police are investigating the deaths of two Arabs believed to have been murdered by Palestinian nationalists, who suspected the two of collaborating with Israeli authorities.

One of the victims, Mohammad Abu-Baker, 46, was head man of Bidya village in the Samaria region of the West Bank. He was killed instantly by unidentified gunmen, who fired on his car at a roadblock early Thursday morning.

Two of his sons were wounded.

The other victim, Ahmed Za’arour, 25, was shot at close range while sitting in a coffee shop in the Israeli Arab town of Umm el-Fahm.

He is said to have been a resident of Amin village, who was forced to leave because of his alleged collaboration.

Violence continued Thursday in the Gaza Strip. Two Palestinians were wounded in skirmishes with Israeli security forces, one in Rafah and the other in Khan Yunis.

Curfews were imposed on the Jabalya and Shati refugee camps near Gaza.

Firebombs were thrown Thursday morning at a border policeman in the Moslem Quarter of the Old City. He was guarding the apartment leased there by Commerce and Industry Minister Ariel Sharon.

The recent spate of political murders is considered serious by the Israeli authorities.

There were eight previous attempts on the life of Abu-Baker, and he was seriously wounded in the last one before the fatal attack.

He was rescued by Jewish settlers four months ago, when a Palestinian mob tried to burn down his house with his seven children inside.

Abu-Baker was hated because of his involvement in land sales to Jewish settlers. He had friendly contacts with them and with the Israeli authorities.

In another development, studies were resumed Thursday at East Jerusalem elementary schools, which had been closed for several months because of disturbances.

About 17,000 pupils attend 32 primary schools and 50 kindergartens. The authorities warned that any school that is used for demonstrations will be closed again.

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