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  • News Brief

    The second snowstorm of this winter hit Israel. At least 10 inches of snow draped Jerusalem, the Golan Heights and other highland areas of Israel early Tuesday, turning large parts of the Jewish state white for the second time this winter. The storm was expected to clear up by Wednesday. In affected areas, schools were…

  • Terror victims defend lawsuits

    Americans who were victims of terrorist attacks in Israel are pushing back against reported Bush administration plans to counter successful lawsuits against the Palestinian Authority.

  • News Brief

    Israel was bracing for major snowstorms. Municipal authorities in Jerusalem, the Golan Heights and other Israeli highland areas went on alert Tuesday for blizzards expected overnight. The snowstorms were preceded by gale-force winds that snarled traffic and, at one point, prompted Ben Gurion Airport to turn away several incoming flights. A ship in Haifa port…

  • Snow falls in Israel

    Several inches of snow fell in Jerusalem and other mountainous areas in Israel.

  • Yosef Begun making up for lost time

    Yosef Begun often thinks back to the long, hard years of imprisonment and struggle for Soviet Jews. Struck even now by the Soviet regime’s success in stopping Jewish life, he feels a personal mission to make up for this lost time.

  • After Winograd: Now what?

    Now that “failure” is officially stamped on Ehud Olmert’s management of last summer’s war against Hezbollah in Lebanon, the question is: What happens now?

  • Russian-speaking Emissaries Bring Seders to an Isolated Community

    Approximately 5,250 miles from Zabars in New York City, 5,680 miles from Jerusalem — and, in April, still resting peacefully under several feet of fresh snow — Kamchatka may be the last place in the world you’d expect to find a Jew diligently grating maror for a seder. Nonetheless, it was in this regional capital…

  • Seders reach isolated community

    Russian-speaking emissaries brought Passover seders to an isolated community eager to learn Jewish rituals, part of a recent Chabad push to use Russians rather than foreigners as emissaries in the former Soviet Union.