Asks for Opinions on Ten Best Books on Jewish-christian Understanding

(Communication to the Editor)

Sir:

I am called upon to give out information as to good books for reading in the field of understanding between Jews and Christians. Would it interest the “Bulletin” to conduct a column to which people could send lists of what they regarded the ten best books in the literature of understanding? It is our thought to find out what books are really being read with profit and advising a large number of people in the matter.

It would be a great help if you could do this.

Sincerely yours,

JOHN W. HERRING, Secretary, Committee on Goodwill Between Jews and Christians of the Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America. Commission on International Justice and Goodwill.

November 10, 1926.

The “Jewish Daily Bulletin” will be glad to receive from its readers lists of ten books which they consider best in the literature of understanding. The “Bulletin” will be pleased to publish these lists in accordance with the request of the Commission on International Justice and Goodwill.

SUGGESTS CHANGE IN FEDERATION SYSTEM

Sir:

The Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies at this time is in the midst of a drive for $4,720,000. The cause is a worthy one, some method should be found whereby every Jew (regardless of his religious affiliations) should be made to contribute. The Federation should be placed in a position whereby it should not be necessary to make a drive every year in order to raise money to enable the Institutions affiliated with it to continue to exist.

However, my purpose in writing is largely to get the reaction of your readers to a thought which I have had in mind for some time. It seems to me that all Charitable Institutions should join the Federation. In other words, it shall be the purpose of the Federation to supply all Charitable Institutions in New York with the necessary funds for its maintenance, and that the Federation should eliminate from its present affiliation Religious Institutions, whether it be Synagogues, Sisterhoods, Talmud Horahs, or Religious Schools.

By combining all the Charitable Institutions I believe it will be an easier task to enroll the great majority, if not all the Jews, as members of the Federation. There will be no such excuse as is given now when an individual is asked for a contribution, or to become a member, that he is contributing to some other Charitable Institution, and, therefore, does not care to join the Federation.

I have also had in mind for some time the possibility of organizing all Religious Institutions, whether it be Synagogues, Religious Schools, or Talmud Torahs, into a Federation, on the same principle as the existing Federation.

Every Jew, regardless of his religious affiliations, should be made to contribute to the Religious Institutions also. In Union there is strength. I think it will strengthen the religious cause greatly in combining all the religious forces.

If a Religious Federation is organized it should create a pension fund for Rabbis. A very serious condition exists today. A good many young men refuse to take up the study of theology, because of the fact they take into consideration that they give up the best part of their lives in study, and for the benefit of their fellowmen. Their salaries, as a general rule are small, which makes it impossible for them to save enough to enable them to take care of themselves in their old age. A fund should be created to pay Rabbis a pension in their old age. Such a fund would create an incentive for young men to take up the study of Theology.

S. HERBERT GOLDEN.

New York, Nov. 11, 1926.

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