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Hebrew University Lectures on Sinai Tablet Inscriptions

(Jewish Telegraphic Agency)

The famous inscriptions on the tablets found at various times at Serabit in the Sinai Peninsula, around which there has been controversy for the past twenty years, have a great bearing on the origin of the alphabet, Professor Robert Blake, of Harvard University, who together with Professor Kirsopp Lake, headed an expedition recently to Sinai, said, lecturing here yesterday at the Hebrew University.

Dr. J. L. Magnes, Chancellor of the Hebrew University, was in the chair.

All the stones, Professor Blake said, were brought by the expedition to Cairo. The expedition had also found two new inscriptions. They had spent about six weeks in Sinai during March and April. They encountered many difficulties in their research work, but they took the view that their efforts had been crowned with success.

Professor Butin and Father Savegnac, speaking after the lecture, expressed doubts regarding the scientific importance of the inscriptions.

J. Louis Loeb, pioneer merchant in Lafayette, Indiana, died at the age of 85.

Mr. Loeb was one of the founders of the mercantile firm, Loeb and Hene, the City National bank, and the Tippecano Loan and Trust company.

He was a leader in the congregation of Temple Israel and was noted for his interest in Jewish and general charities.

Julius Louis Loeb was born March 23, 1842, in Rheinpfalz, Bavaria, Germany, and came to America in 1866. He started work with a small pack, selling from door to door. In 1871 the firm of Loeb and Hene was opened.

Mr. Loeb was the oldest member of B’nai B’rith in his district, having joined the Order 63 years ago. He was also one of the oldest members of Segal Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of Temple Israel.

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