Menu JTA Search

Valuable Collection Goes to Hebrew University

(Jewish Telegraphic Agency)

The Collection of Autographs and Portraits started by Dr. Schwadron in the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem has recently been augmented by an interesting gift of letters and photographs from the bequest of the late Professor Hermann Shapira.

This collection was presented by Abraham Aldema, a teacher in the Gymnasium of Tel-Aviv, and contains many rare items, including the first program for the foundation of the Jewish National Fund, notes on the history of the earliest stages of the Zionist movement, letters of Rabbi Mohilever, Lilienbloom, Slominski, and others. It comprises, also, a humorous parody entitled “Masechet Sherayim” which was never published.

Mrs. Ada L. Hyam has presented the Library with a collection of letters written by Ney Elias Sr. and Ney Elias Jr. The latter explored the new course of the Yellow River; later explored the course of the Oxus, pressed through to Chittral, and once traversed the desert Gobi through to Nishni Novgorod in the interests of the Royal Geographical Society of London. In addition, Mrs. Hyam has sent a number of documents pertaining to Dr. Bernard Magnussen, a Dutch Jew who took part in the struggle for Jewish emancipation in the forties of the last century.

Prof. Sigmund Freud has sent to the Library the new edition of his works in ten volumes.

Dr. Julius Jarcho of New York founded a Department of Sports and Athletics in the Library. Among the books forwarded by him are also many on folk songs, folk dances, and pageants.

The Committee of the Library in Bucarest has sent about two hundred volumes including many items of importance with regard to the history of the Jews in Roumania.

Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Joffe of New York City have sent to the Library a collection of about 1000 books pertaining particularly to Mathematics and Natural History. Included in this collection are a series of Mathematics magazines as well as many rare old volumes published in the 18th and early 19th century.

NEXT STORY