Lamport Will Leaves $1,000,000 for Jewish Education and Charity

A sum said to approximate $1,000,000 was left for Jewish educational and charitable purposes in the United States, Poland, Russia and Palestine in the will of Nathan Lamport, cotton merchant and real estate investor, Orthodox leader and president of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, who died at Dobbs Ferry on August 13.

The will was filed for probate on Friday in Surrogate’s Court. Five trustees were designated in the will to administer the funds under the nams Ansl Foundation, the name being derived from the initials of the Hebrew name of Mr. Lamport and his first wife, Abraham, Nhemiah (and) Sarah Lamport, Samuel Hellinger, Mr. Lamport’s attorney, Samuel C. Lamport and Arthur M. Lamport, sons of the late Mr. Lamport, Leonard Rothstein and Marks Hurowitz, two sons-in-law, were named turstees and executors.

The income from a trust fund of $100,000 was provided for Mrs. Celia Lamport, his second wife, while $75,000 was willed outright to Mrs. Mildred Rothstein, a daughter of Mr. Lamport. No other bequests were made to the eight other children, the will declaring that they are not in need of bequests from their father. To his twenty-two grandchildren Mr. Lamport left half of the residue following the first two bequests. The grandchildren will receive the income from the funds left them, and will not receive the principal until the death of their parents.

The Ausl Foundation is to receive the other half of the residue and the $100,000 principal of the trust fund left for Mrs. Celia Lamport. It is estimated that his amount will be approximately $1,000,000.

Besides the $200,000 which Mr. Lamport contributed during his lifetime to the Yeshiva College, provision is made in the will that 20 percent of the Foundation funds are to go for educational intitutions in the United States, 20 percent for educational institutions in Palestine for educational institutions in Poland, 10 percent in Russia, 10 percent each for Jewish philanthropies in United States, particularly in New York City and in Palestine, 5 percent. each for Jewish philanthropies in Russia and Poland, and the last 10 percent for loans to worthy persons.

The instructions for the distribution of funds state that the money is to go “for the purpose of furnishing financial assistance to institutions for the teaching of strict Orthodox Jewish faith and particularly for the training of rabbis and teachers in that faith; and for the furnishing of assistace to free Hebrew schools in the United States, Palestine and Europe; and for the purpose of assisting worthy persons financially by loans of small amouts.”

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