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Jewish Organizations Get $875,000 from $6,000,000 in Conrad Hubert’s Will

The thirty-four institutions which are most worthy of aid in the country, in the opinion of former President Coolidge, former Governor Alfred E. Smith and Julius Rosenwald, the Chicago philanthropist, were made public Sunday. The three men served as a committee to select the beneficiaries of the estate of the late Conrad Hubert, pioneer Jewish manufacturer of electric flashlights.

The bequests have been divided into three classifications: institutions which will receive immediate amounts from cash on hand, those which will share in the first $1,000,000 realized from the unliquidated parts of the estate, and those which will share in the remainder of the estate when it is finally liquidated.

Among the Jewish organizations which will receive aid are, the Jewish Mental Health Society, New York, $250,000 to be used toward building a new hospital; the Jewish Theological Seminary, $250,000; the Young Men’s Hebrew Association, of New York, $175,000 to be used toward the cost of its new building, and Beth Israel Hospital, New York, $200,000 to be used to complete its hospital building.

Conrad Hubert, whose name at birth was Chaim Hurewitz, was a native of Minsk, Russia. He died in Cannes, France, Feb. 14, 1928. Under the terms of his will, one-quarter of his estate was left to his sister and two brothers. The remainder of the estate, about $6,000,000, was left to religious, educational, charitable and benevolent institutions, to be selected by “a committee of three prominent citizens, who shall investigate and determine the institutions to receive such gifts.” Upon the approval of these findings, the trustees, by the terms of the will, are directed to pay over the funds.

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