J. D. B. News Letter

together and for nine years now were separated. When de Haas was close enough Lipsky extended his hand—what a wealth of feeling there was in that gesture. De Haas accepted it. Their eyes met for only a moment. But it was enough. Peace had been concluded. De Haas was followed by the other two. It took almost a full minute before the delegates and the visitors came to. Then pandemonium broke loose. Those who had sufficient control of their emotions cheered and sang the Hatikvah. It was a great moment, not to be forgotten.

And it was for this peace that the delegates traveled from every part of the country. It was for this peace that lovers of Zion throughout the country prayed. It was for this peace—it became known last night—that the leaders of the World Zionist Organization pleaded.

Of course Mr. Justice Brandeis was not there, but Brandeis—his spirit was ever present. In 1921 the conflict centered about two men: Brandeis vs. Weizmann with the well known results. In 1930 it was just Brandeis. Even before his reassuring letter was read the delegates felt he was coming nearer to them; already they were charmed by his influence. He could have had anything he wanted. It should be remembered his letter was presented to the convention at least twenty-four hours before the final peace pact was agreed upon.

Under these circumstances, it is difficult to point to a record of achievement. Knowing that an extraordinary event is about to take place, the delegates were not in a mood to be bothered with details. The very life, the whole future of the Zionist movement in America was at stake—who had time to think of committee reports! Therefore all routine matters were referred to the new incoming Executive Committee.

ONE MINOR MISTAKE COMMITTED

There was, to be sure, one mistake committed. Attention was called to it by Mr. Lipsky—a little too late. When the list of the twelve and the six was submitted, the twelve who for reorganization purposes had been on the “outs” and the six who had been on the “ins,” it should have been combined and the names read in alphabetical order. Zangwill once said “every label is a libel.” This should have been avoided. It wasn’t done, thus causing slight confusion and provoking some humorous remarks. Whether it should or should not have been done this writer ventures no opinion. The list in one form or another showed very clearly, however, that the Zionist movement is in the hands of friends. These will now have to get together and lay the foundation for a renewed Zionist activity in this country. To this all alike are committed.

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