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Roosevelt Failure, Growth of Nationalist Movement Here Voiced by Nazi Paper

Hope that the Roosevelt Administration will fail and that anti-Semitism will grow in America was expressed here today in Der Stuermer, newspaper edited by the notorious Julius Streicher, commander of the storm troops in Nuremberg and organizer of the April boycott against the Jews.

On the eve of the convention of the National Socialist Party, which opens this week in Nuremberg, the newspaper, which is expected to be distributed to over half a million delegates and guests, asserts that the Roosevelt Administration is too much influenced by the Jews. It predicts that the Republican Party will come to power at the next election in the United States.

“Then,” asserts the paper, “America will have a nationalist movement which will make it impossible for Rabbi Wise to be the adviser of the American Government on foreign policy.”

STRAUS APPOINTMENT MANIPULATED

The paper charges that Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, honorary president of the American Jewish Congress; Bernard M. Baruch, outstanding financier and industrialist, and Henry Morgenthau, former Ambassador to Turkey and head of President Roosevelt’s commission to the wheat stabilization conference, helped to make Jesse I. Straus American Ambassador to France because “the Jews hope that Straus may destroy Germany through Paris.”

It further asserts that it had been proposed that Mr. Morgenthau be named as Ambassador to Germany.

GERMANS DISMISSED HERE

Forgetting that German concerns are dismissing or have dismissed all their Jewish employees, the newspaper complains bitterly that Jewish employers in the United States are discharging their German workers. This alleged state of affairs, according to Der Stuermer, is provoking fury in American circles “at this violation of rights by one class of citizens against another.”

The paper admits that the central American Jewish organizations have abstained from an open anti-Nazi boycott but explains that this is because “American Jews feel if too much publicity is given to German anti-Semitism, it will inspire anti-Semitism also in America which the Jews have good reason to fear.”

The long diatribe concludes with what is a revelation to the German public—that there had been a split in the Nazi ranks in New York, and that the Nazi leader, Paul Manger, had been the victim of intrigues, had lost his job and had been evicted from his home for inability to pay his rent.

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