The Bulletin’s Day Book

Everybody is going into th liquor business. Or so it ust seem to Nelsom M. Ruttenberg, counsel for the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board which passes upon New York City’s liquor license applicants. He splits his time between Chairman Mulrooney’s office at Albany and his own in the State Building near City Hall in New York. Because of the press of his official labors, Mr. Ruttenberg found himself forced to resign recently from the presidency of the Jewish National Fund. He remains a director of the fund and member of its administrative board. Mr. Ruttenberg was formerly a deputy commissioner in the Police Department. He likes repsonsibility, enjoys keeping busy and gets more done in less time than most men. But there’s no cncealing his jubilation that the peak of the license rush has at last been passed.

You will find a real friend of the Jewish people, and a friend of the Jewish people, and a fiercely cruading enemy of prijudice, in Miss Rachel Du Bois of Teacher’s College, columbia University. Miss Du Bois is devoting her life to erasing the inroads of bigotry from the minds of school children. In endless classroom experiments, she has sought to impress upon the child mind the great sin and menaces of intoleration. “All peoples of the earth have their individual traits and customs”, she teaches, “And because of them, the world is enriched. Let us learn to value our differences.” Hers is a vorkable philosophy. In one corner of the class, a young Irish or German boy rises to extoll the greatness of some renowned Jew. He talks for five minutes, in glowing terms, then takes his seat. Up go the hands of the Jewish boys to do the same for great Germans and Irishmen. Thus, she brings hope for a new generation of John Haynes Holmes’ rather than William Dudley Pelley’s.

Twelve years have passed since a Jewish woman wrote a compassionate letter tothe mother of her son’s murderer, in which she said: “I stretch out my hand to you, poorest of all women. Tell your son I forgive him in the name and spirit of myh assassinated son, as God Almighty will forgive him if he confesses and repents.” The writer was Walter Rathenau’s mother.

When Butinsky, first great Jewish sculptor, was freindless and pressed for the meanest necessities, I. Goldberg, took him in and cared fro him. Given food and shelter, the sculptor’s genius began to take form like the wet clay between his hands. Butinsky created his tremendous, moving conception of Teh Golus or “Jew in Exile” which so stirred the emotions of Jacob Schiff that he ordered several copies of it cast immediately. One he presented to President Wilson and another work, “Universal Peace”, stands in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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