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3,500 Honor Einstein at Carnegie Hall

More than 3,500 people representing science, industry, the arts and public life, gathered at Carnegie Hall last night to bid farewell to Professor Albert Einstein on the eve of his departure for Europe, and to honor him as a man of science who “in his perception of the rhythm of the spheres and the music of the universe has pointed the way to a fuller spiritual life.”

The tribute to the scientist was paid in the form of a concert in which operatic and concert stars participated and which was attended by many musicians and composers. Leopold Godowsky, who acted as chairman, sat with Professor and Mrs. Einstein in a box. Arnold Schoenberg, Austrian-Jewish composer, and Mrs. Schoenberg were also among those who came to honor the scientist.

the climax of the evening came with the presentation of a Scroll of Honor signed by outstanding musicians as a token of their high regard for Professor Einstein’s devotion to music, as well as his scientific achievements.

THE SCROLL’S TRIBUTE

The scroll was dedicated to Professor Einstein, “who, in his contribution to science has advanced the march of civilization and in his devotion to art has drawn these two worlds nearer in the development of culture.

“Who, in his perception of the thythm of the spheres and the music of the universe, has pointed the way to a full life;

“In recognition of his noble and ardent efforts toward the betterment of mankind, we, who seek the truth in music, as he seeks it in science, hereby inscribe our names in profoundest admiration and esteem for one whom we are proud to call our colleague.”

In presenting the Scroll to Professor Einstein, Leonard Liebling, music critic of the New York American and editor of the Musical Courier, lauded the scientist’s association with the arts, particularly music.

Among the other speakers were Carl Sherman, president of the New York Zionist Region, and Magistrates Jonah J. Goldstein and Benjamin E. Greenspan, who jointly head the Council of Jewish Organizations for Palestine. A fund of $6,000 was raised from the concert, which will be devoted to transporting and setting Jewish children from Germany to Palestine.

Professor Einstein’s address in full:

“It gives me great joy to thank the prominent artists who tonight have given their efforts toward a noble work of philanthropy. Art is one of man’s greatest blessings–self-sacrificing charity is by far the most important and most beautiful thing we can accomplish. The artists we have heard here have given us both.

I must thank them personally also, for my name has been linked to this evening’s entertainment. A sense of humility would have prevented me from permitting such an association had not the cause involved been the alleviation of terrible need: the cause of rescuing German Jewish children from a hostile environment, to save them from a spiritual and material misery, and to enable them to grow up in happy and healthy surroundings.

It has been mostly in times of peril and need that great works of progress have come into being. This the work of emancipation and law-giving achieved by Moses was born of the oppression suffered by the Jewish people in Egypt. Thus, too, we may hope that out of the military menace of our time shall grow a system of international law observed by all, that out of the collapse of our economic organism a more firmly secure, better directed economic order shall develop.

Let me, finally, thank all those who have had a share in bringing about the sucess of this evening’s entertainment.”

The artists who participated in the concert included Mary Lewis, Emma Redell, Josef and Rosina Lhevinne, Arnold Tokatyan, Emanuel List, Harry Kaufman, Conrad Thibault, Vera Aronson, Mary S. Coolidge and Ethel Chasins.

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