Jewish Activities in the Metropolitan Area

Financing of social work should be looked at from the standpoint of the entire city and not of the individual boroughs, Municipal Court Justice Murray Hearn, a vice-president of the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities, declared in a statement made public last night in support of the Federation’s current campaign to raise $500,000 for its twenty-five affiliated societies. Justice Hearn was chairman of the 1933 deficit drive.

“The oneness of the Greater City,” said Judge Hearn, “is an important point in considering the future of Jewish social work. The recent two-year study by the Jewish Communal Survey of Greater New York indicated that if the city is looked at as a whole, Jewish institutions are up to the needs of the Jewish population in a number of ways. There is a sufficient number of beds to care for children in institutions, and a sufficient number of beds in Jewish general hospitals. If, on the other hand, these matters are regarded from the point of view of the individual boroughs, we find in some localities a wide difference between the local needs and the actual facilities.

“It is therefore obvious that if the present frontiers of the boroughs were rigidly maintained, and guards set up against the incursions of residents from other sections, each borough would have to develop, with the growth of its Jewish population, adequate institutions and facilities for handling its problems without outside help. The fact is, however, that residents in Manhattan, the national center of wealth, have an obligation to take a definite financial responsibility for the welfare problems of Brooklyn.”

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