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Fascist Parley Compromises on Jews

Representatives of sixteen Fascist organizations from fourteen countries meeting here at the first international conference on Fascism today had unanimously adopted a resolution asking each land to treat the Jewish question on the principle of national sovereignty.

In an impassioned attack upon the Jews, Jan Motza, leader of the Rumanian Iron Guard delegation, made a demand for an extreme anti-Semitic stand. The Italians, under whose auspices the conference was called, were leaders in the more moderate Jewish policy that was adopted by the congress.

The resolution stated that “the Jewish question cannot be converted into a universal and wholesale campaign of hatred against the Jews.”

IRISH AND ITALIAN OBJECT

When the Fascist congress threatened to break up because of the stand forced upon it by Eugenio Coseleschi, Italian chairman, aided by General Owen O’Duffy, leader of the Irish Blue Shirts, the following was added to the resolution to appease the Danish, Rumanian and Norwegian Fascists, who are under the influence of the German Nazis:

“On the other hand, many Jewish individuals and groups are living like arrogant conquerors, injuring the moral and material interests of the country harboring them, constituting a sort of state within a state, advantageously profiting by all benefits and refusing all duties.

RUMANIAN ATTACKS

“Secondly, there is a gross Jewish tendency towards elements conducive to international revolution. This conference proclaims war against these elements and is ready to combat them.”

In his speech attacking the Jews, Motza declared: “They are making our life impossible in Rumania.” He also accused the Jews of “fostering greed and egoism.” Judaism and Freemasonry, he declared, “are allied against Christianity.”

Only twenty-six delegates in all attended the congress. The organizations they represented were, for the most part, groups of no great standing either internationally or in their own countries.

RESOLUTION TABLED

With the objection of the Nazi-minded delegates to the original resolution against any action against the Jews, the resolution was tabled as a result of action by the French, Danish and Belgian delegations. The resolution, as it was finally adopted, was passed after a long debate.

The agenda of the conference, first of its kind, called for a united program of action against “liberalism and Marxism.”

A greeting was telegraphed by the conference to Premier Mussolini, hailing him for his Fascist triumphs.

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