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Major Anti-jewish Laws Still in Force in North Africa, Algiers Correspondent Reports

There has been no complete abolition of the anti-Jewish laws in North Africa as yet despite Gen. Giraud’s announcement this week that “a decree signed in Vichy is not valid in North Africa” and notwithstanding the fact that the department dealing with Jewish affairs has been dissolved, a broadcast from Algiers said today.

The broadcast was made by John MacVane, a British correspondent stationed in Algeria. “Jewish doctors and lawyers are still not allowed to resume practicing. ” he reported. “Civil and military regulations still make sharp distinctions between Jews and non-Jews.”

Jewish leaders in Algiers, who questioned a high French official as to when the anti-Jewish laws would actually be abolished, were told that they should not expect the outlawing of the Vichy restrictions against Jews, the British correspondent reported. At present, the anti-Jewish laws are only slightly eased, he added.

The most important anti-Jewish laws issued by the Vichy regime have not yet been rescinded in North Africa. They are the law signed by Petain last February abrogating the historic Cremieux decree of 1870 giving Jews in Algeria equal rights with Frenchmen, and the Vichy decree of June 2, 1940 which bars persons of Jewish blood from public office and certain professions. The Vichy decrees cancelled by Gen. Giraud’s order this week are of minor importance, but the Morocco radio, in announcing their abolition, implied that all anti-Jewish laws had been nullified.

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