Jewish Communities Expand Programs on Services to Aged, C.j.w.f. Survey Shows

Expansion of programs and services to meet increased institutional, cultural and social needs of the Jewish aged population was recorded in 1949 by Jewish communities throughout the United States and Canada, it was reported today by the Social Planning Department of the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds.

Closer cooperation between hospitals, homes for the aged and family service agencies has resulted in setting up more effective medical and nursing services in institutions and the development of home medical care programs which enable the aged patient to receive competent treatment in his own home, the report says. In addition, other services are provided, including foster home care, housing, organized recreation and employment.

Recognizing that one of the most depressing features of old age in our American society is “enforced retirement,” which causes the individual to feel useless and unwanted, Jewish communities have established clubs for older persons. Some 60 Jewish community centers throughout the country sponsored social groups and organized recreation programs to help older citizens regain a feeling of belonging and accomplishment. Opportunity was also provided for older persons to continue their creative abilities and acquire new skills.

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