Both Presidentlal Candidates Had Jewish Supporters, Sur Vey Shows

Jewish leadership in numerous cities throughout the country was divided almost equally in support of the two Presidential candidates–Gen. Dwight Eisenhower and Gov. Adlai Stevenson–during the election campaign, a survey here established today.

The belief was expressed in competent circles here that as a result of today’s elections, an attempt will be made early in the new session of Congress to repeal the McCarran-Walter Immigration Act which has been vigorously opposed by Jewish and other minority groups, as well as by all liberal elements in the country. The controversial immigration act, which becomes effective on December 24, was denounced by both Presidential candidates and by many members of Congress who retained their seats in today’s elections.

Ten Jewish Congressmen sought re-election today, while an eleventh, Rep. A.A. Ribicoff, of Connecticut, ran as a candidate for the Senate. (At the time the Bulletin went to press the complete results of the elections were not obtainable), Sen. Herbert H. Lehman, who was elected in 1950, was not up for re-election, since he still has four years to serve.

U.S. POLICY ON AID TO ISRAEL WILL REMAIN UNCHANGED

In a radio address last night, on the eve of the elections, Sen. Lehman called on the American people “to give a mandate by their vote for the outright repeal of the McCarran-Walter immigration law and for its immediate replacement by a law which would admit persons into this country on the basis of their individual worth, character quality and suitability.”

Despite the new faces in Congress and the new occupant of the White House, every indication points to a continuation of United States assistance to Israel. Friendship for Israel was expressed by both candidates during the election campaign, in conformity with the platforms of their parties. No major change is therefore expected in U.S. policy regarding financial aid to the Jewish State.

In today’s elections Gen, Douglas MacArthur appeared on ballots in several states as the Presidential candidate of Gerald L.K. Smith’s “Christian Nationalist Party,” an extreme right-wing and anti-Semitic group. MacArthur failed to repudiate the Smith group or to ask that his name be withdrawn as their candidate. This matter was drawn to his attention by newspapermen and others, but he consistently refused to disavow the activities in his behalf by Smith’s party.

NEXT STORY