Two Nazi War Criminals Given Life Terms in Separate Trials in West Germany

Life imprisonment at hard labor was imposed on former SS leader Anton Ipsling by a Nuremberg court yesterday for his role in murdering at least 15 Jews at Camp Skarzyszko Kamienna in Poland, of which he was the commander. He denied the accusation, but the presiding judge asserted that, as head of the camp, Ipsling had changed from “a harmless citizen to a brutal murderer.”

Fritz Hildebrand, 04 a former SS lieutenant, was sentenced by a Bremen court this weekend to life imprisonment for murder and complicity in the wartime murder of more than 2,000 Jewish men, women and children in three forced labor camps in occupied Poland.

More than 220 witnesses were heard during the 11-month trial, his second on war crimes charges. He was convicted of having supervised the shooting of 2,000 Jews, including children in the Galicia district. He also was found guilty of having arranged for the shooting, as “examples,” of three Jews who tried to escape from the Boryslaw forced labor camp, of which he was commandant.

He was first arrested in 1953 and sentenced to eight years in prison on conviction in four cases of murder and one of manslaughter. He was released after serving two years. He was arrested a second time in March 1965, when new evidence was found against him.

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